The Full Story

Summer Pet 
Strategies

Article from: BH&G magazine: 2022

Barbecues

During outdoor parties, keep pets away from the grill (place a baby gate around it) and don't feed your pets scraps; you don't want them to associate the grill  with treats. Also know that certain summer foods are dangerous for dogs and cats: corn on the cob (the cob can lodge in the digestive tract), onions, garlic, and meat gristle and bones (which pets can choke on). 

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Sidewalks

Hot pavement can burn the pads of your pet's paws. If you can't comfortably hold your hand on the pavement, it's too hot for your dog. Grass and soil stay cooler. Even taking walks during the early morning and evening when its cooler can make walking a lot more pleasurable. 

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Frankie

Storms & Fireworks

The loud, unpredictable noises and flashes of light in fireworks displays and storms (plus the change in barometric pressure) make these events terrifying for some pets.

Be prepared: Setup a yoga mat or comfy throw rug to create a safe space where your can retreat during the fireworks or when thunderstorms occur. Lure your dog or cat to the area with some of their favorite treats and/or toys so they have a positive association with the space, says Sharon Crowell-Davis, D.V.M. PhD. professor of behavioral medicine in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Georgia. If your animal is prone to anxiety or has had major panic attacks, speak to you vet about medication that may help keep them calm. 

Safe & Sound

Loosely wrapping your dog in weighted blanket can be calming. Never scold for anxious behavior like pacing, chewing, digging, or barking. 

Pools & Lakes

Not all dogs know how to swim! Pools can be especially dangerous because dogs can't hang on or use ladder to climb out the way humans can, says Margaret M. Duxbury, D.V.M, DACVB, a veterinary behaviorist in 

Minnetonka, MN. Monitor dogs closely around all water so they don't accidently fall in.

If your dog's not attracted to water, don't force it, but teaching her how to swim is an option. Put her in a body harness that has a handle for you to grasp. Start in the shallow end and stay close while your dog paddles around.